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ref: -2019 tags: Vale photostability bioarxiv DNA oragami photobleaching date: 03-10-2020 21:59 gmt revision:5 [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

A 6-nm ultra-photostable DNA Fluorocube for fluorescence imaging

  • Cy3n = sulfonated version of Cy3.
  • JF549 = azetidine modified version of tetramethyl rhodamine.

Also including some correspondence with the authors:

Me

Nice work and nice paper, thanks for sharing .. and not at all what I had expected from Ron's comments! Below are some comments ... would love your opinion.

I'd expect that the molar absorption coefficients for the fluorocubes should be ~6x larger than for the free dyes and the single dye cubes (measured?), yet the photon yields for all except Cy3N maybe are around the yield for one dye molecule. So the quantum yield must be decreased by ~6x?

This in turn might be from a middling FRET which reduces lifetime, thereby the probability of ISC, photoelectron transfer, and hence photobleaching.

I wonder if in the case of ATTO 647N Cy5 and Cy3, the DNA is partly shielding the fluorphores from solvent (ala ethidium bromide), which also helps with stability, just like in fluorescent proteins. ATTO 647N generates a lot of singlet oxygen, who knows what it's doing to DNA.

Can you do a log-log autocorrelation of the blinking timeseries of the constructs? This may reveal different rate constants controlling dark/light states (though, for 6 coupled objects, might not be interpretable!)

Also, given the effect of DNA shielding, have you compared to free dyes to single-dye cubes other than supp fig 10? The fact that sulfonation made such a huge effect in brightness is suggestive.

Again, these are super interesting & exciting results!

Author

I haven't directly looked at the molar absorption coefficient but judging from the data that I collected for the absorption spectra, there is certainly an increase for the fluorocubes compared to single dyes. I agree that this would be an interesting experiment and I am planning collect data to measure the molar absorption coefficient. I would also expect a ~6 fold increase for the Fluorocubes.

Yes, we suspect homo FRET to help reduce photobleaching. So far we only measured lifetimes in bulk but are planning to obtain lifetime data on the single-molecule level soon.

We also wondered if the DNA is providing some kind of shield for the fluorophores but could not design an experiment to directly test this hypothesis. If you have a suggestion, that would be wonderful.

The log-log autocorrelation of blinking events is indeed difficult to interpret. Already individual intensity traces of fluorocubes are difficult to analyze as many of them get brighter before they bleach. We are also wondering if some fluorocubes are emitting two photons simultaneously. We will hopefully be able to measure this soon.

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ref: -0 tags: Na Ji 2p two photon fluorescent imaging pulse splitting damage bleaching date: 03-10-2020 21:44 gmt revision:6 [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-18204458 High-speed, low-photodamage nonlinear imaging using passive pulse splitters

  • Core idea: take a single pulse and spread it out to N=2 kN= 2^k pulses using reflections and delay lines.
  • Assume two optical processes, signal SI αS \propto I^{\alpha} and photobleaching/damage DI βD \propto I^{\beta} , β>α>1\beta \gt \alpha \gt 1
  • Then an NN pulse splitter requires N 11/αN^{1-1/\alpha} greater average power but reduces the damage by N 1β/α.N^{1-\beta/\alpha}.
  • At constant signal, the same NN pulse splitter requires N\sqrt{N} more power, consistent with two photon excitation (proportional to the square of the intensity: N pulses of N/N\sqrt{N}/N intensity, 1/N per pulse fluorescence, Σ1\Sigma \rightarrow 1 overall fluorescence.)
  • This allows for shorter dwell times, higher power at the sample, lower damage, slower photobleaching, and better SNR for fluorescently labeled slices.
  • Examine the list of references too, e.g. "Multiphoton multifocal microscopy exploiting a diffractive optical element" (2003)

  • In practice, a pulse picker is useful when power is limited and bleaching is not a problem (as is with GCaMP6x)

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ref: -2011 tags: two photon cross section fluorescent protein photobleaching Drobizhev date: 03-10-2020 21:10 gmt revision:7 [6] [5] [4] [3] [2] [1] [head]

PMID-21527931 Two-photon absorption properties of fluorescent proteins

  • Significant 2-photon cross section of red fluorescent proteins (same chromophore as DsRed) in the 700 - 770nm range, accessible to Ti:sapphire lasers ...
    • This corresponds to a S 0S nS_0 \rightarrow S_n transition
    • But but, photobleaching is an order of magnitude slower when excited by the direct S 0S 1S_0 \rightarrow S_1 transition (but the fluorophores can be significantly less bright in this regime).
      • Quote: the photobleaching of DsRed slows down by an order of magnitude when the excitation wavelength is shifted to the red, from 750 to 950 nm (32).
    • See also PMID-18027924
  • 2P cross-section in both the 700-800nm and 1000-1100 nm range corresponds to the chromophore polarizability, and is not related to 1p cross section.
  • This can be useflu for multicolor imaging: excitation of the higher S0 → Sn transition of TagRFP simultaneously with the first, S0 → S1, transition of mKalama1 makes dual-color two-photon imaging possible with a single excitation laser wavelength (13)
  • Why are red GECIs based on mApple (rGECO1) or mRuby (RCaMP)? dsRed2 or TagRFP are much better .. but maybe they don't have CP variants.
  • from https://elifesciences.org/articles/12727

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ref: -2007 tags: photobleaching GFP date: 09-10-2019 01:42 gmt revision:1 [0] [head]

PMID-17179937 Major signal increase in fluorescence microscopy through dark-state relaxation (2007)

  • 5-25x increase in fluorescence yields.
  • Idea: allow the (dark) triplet states to decay naturally by keeping inter-pulse intervals of illumination greater than 1us.
  • Works for both 1p and 2p.
  • For volume imaging via 2p, I don’t think that 1um decay time is much of an issue; revisit given fluorophores after >1ms!
  • Suggests again that transition from triplet dark state to excited higher state is a prominent or significant cause of photobleaching; also suggests that triple quenching will have limited utility in scanned or pulsed 2p systems (will have more utility in 1p systems, perhaps..)
  • Atto532 dye has low intersystem crossing to the triplet state (1%) [3,5,14] .. humm.
  • 2p total photon emission seems to flatten above 100GW/cm^2 intensity.
  • 2p absorption is easily saturated independent of pulse width: for short pulses, high intensity leads to absorption to T1 state, which has high cross-section to the Tn>1 state; longer pulses give more time for single-photon absorption.
  • τp by m = 200 and hence the pulse energy by 14-fold does not have a considerable effect on G2p. This obviously indicates that the saturation of the S0 → S1 or of the T1 → Tn > 1 excitation eliminates any dependence on pulse peak intensity or energy.

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ref: -2016 tags: fluorescent proteins photobleaching quantum yield piston GFP date: 06-19-2019 14:33 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-27240257 Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

  • Cranfill PJ1,2, Sell BR1, Baird MA1, Allen JR1, Lavagnino Z2,3, de Gruiter HM4, Kremers GJ4, Davidson MW1, Ustione A2,3, Piston DW
  • Model bleaching as log(F)=αlog(P)+clog(F) = -\alpha log(P) + c or k bleach=bI αk_{bleach} = b I^{\alpha} where F is the fluorescence intensity, P is the illumination power, and b and c are constants.
    • Most fluorescent proteins have α\alpha > 1, which means superlinear photobleaching -- more power, bleaches faster.
  • Catalog the degree to which each protein tends to form aggregates by tagging to the ER and measuring ER morphology. Fairly thorough -- 10k cells each FP.