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ref: -0 tags: ocaml application functional programming date: 10-11-2022 21:36 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/26475765/ocaml-function-with-variable-number-of-arguments

From this I learned that in ocaml you can return not just functions (e.g. currying) but appliations of yet-to-be named functions.

let sum f = f 0 ;;
let arg a b c = c ( b + a ) ;;
let z a = a ;;

then

sum (arg 1) ;; 

is well-typed as (int -> `a) -> `a = <fun> e.g. an application of a function that converts int to `a. Think of it as the application of Xa to argument ( 0 + 1 ), where Xa is the argument (per type signature). Zero is supplied by the definition of 'sum'.

 sum (arg 1) (arg 2);; 

can be parsed as

(sum (arg 1)) (arg 2) ;; 

'(arg 2)' outputs an application of an int & a yet-to be determined function to 'a,

E.g. it's typed as int -> (int -> `a) -> `a = <fun>. So, you can call it Xa passed to above.

Or, Xa = Xb( ( 0 + 1 ) + 2)

where, again, Xb is a yet-to-be defined function that is supplied as an argument.

Therefore, you can collapse the whole chain with the identity function z. But, of course, it could be anything else -- square root perhaps for MSE?

All very clever.

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ref: -0 tags: automatic programming inductive functional igor date: 07-29-2014 02:07 gmt revision:0 [head]

Inductive Rule Learning on the Knowledge Level.

  • 2011.
  • v2 of their IGOR inductive-synthesis program.
  • Quote: The general idea of learning domain specific problem solving strategies is that first some small sample problems are solved by means of some planning or problem solving algorithm and that then a set of generalized rules are learned from this sample experience. This set of rules represents the competence to solve arbitrary problems in this domain.
  • My take is that, rather than using heuristic search to discover programs by testing specifications, they use memories of the output to select programs directly (?)
    • This is allegedly a compromise between the generate-and-test and analytic strategies.
  • Description is couched in CS-lingo which I am inexperienced in, and is perhaps too high-level, a sin I too am at times guilty of.
  • It seems like a good idea, though the examples are rather unimpressive as compared to MagicHaskeller.

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ref: -0 tags: putamen functional organization basal ganglia date: 02-24-2012 21:01 gmt revision:0 [head]

PMID-6705861 Single cell studies of the primate putamen. I. Functional organization.

  • Cells in the striatum have very low levels of activity -- some are simply not spontaneously active.
  • Other cells are tonically active at 3-6Hz (cholinergic?)
  • ( Most cells related to the direction of movement, not necessarily force.
  • Two types of load reactions: short latency (presumably sensory) and long-latency (motor -- related to the active return movement of the arm.)
  • Timing suggests that the striatum does not play a role in the earliest phases of movement, consistent with cooling studies, kainic acid lesions, or microstimulation. Only 19% of neurons were active before movement.
  • Many neurons were reactive to both active and passive movements in the same joint / direction.
    • The BG receive afferents from joint and not muscle receptors.

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ref: Douglas-1991.01 tags: functional microcircuit cat visual cortex microstimulation date: 12-29-2011 05:12 gmt revision:3 [2] [1] [0] [head]

PMID-1666655[0] A functional microcircuit for cat visual cortex

  • Using in vivo stim and record, They describe what may be a 'cannonical' circuit for the cortex.
  • Not dominated by excitation / inhibition, but rather cell dynamics.
  • Thalamus weaker than poysynaptic inupt from the cortex for excitation.
  • Focuses on Hubel and Wiesel style stuffs. Cats, SUA.
  • Stimulated the geniculate body & observed the response using intracellular electrodes from 102 neurons.
  • Their traces show lots of long-duration inhibition.
  • Probably not relevant to my purposes.

____References____

[0] Douglas RJ, Martin KA, A functional microcircuit for cat visual cortex.J Physiol 440no Issue 735-69 (1991)

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ref: work-0 tags: functional programming compilation ocaml date: 08-24-2009 14:33 gmt revision:0 [head]

The implementation of functional programming languages - book!

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ref: work-0 tags: ocaml mysql programming functional date: 07-03-2009 19:16 gmt revision:2 [1] [0] [head]

Foe my work I store a lot of analyzed data in SQL databases. In one of these, I have stored the anatomical target that the data was recorded from - namely, STN or VIM thalamus. After updating the analysis programs, I needed to copy the anatomical target data over to the new SQL tables. Where perl may have been my previous go-to language for this task, I've had enuogh of its strange quiks, hence decided to try it in Ruby (worked, but was not so elegant, as I don't actually know Ruby!) and then Ocaml.

ocaml
#use "topfind"
#require "mysql"

(* this function takes a query and a function that converts entries 
in a row to Ocaml tuples *)
let read_table db query rowfunc =
	let r = Mysql.exec db query in
	let col = Mysql.column r in
	let rec loop = function
		| None      -> []
		| Some x    -> rowfunc col x :: loop (Mysql.fetch r)
	in
	loop (Mysql.fetch r)
	;;
	

let _ = 
	let db = Mysql.quick_connect ~host:"crispy" ~database:"turner" ~password:"" ~user:"" () in
	let nn = Mysql.not_null in
	(* this function builds a table of files (recording sessions) from a given target, then 
	uses the mysql UPDATE command to propagate to the new SQL database. *)
	let propagate targ = 
		let t = read_table db 
			("SELECT file, COUNT(file) FROM `xcor2` WHERE target='"^targ^"' GROUP BY file")
			(fun col row -> (
				nn Mysql.str2ml (col ~key:"file" ~row), 
				nn Mysql.int2ml (col ~key:"COUNT(file)" ~row) )
			)
		in
		List.iter (fun (fname,_) -> 
			let query = "UPDATE `xcor3` SET `target`='"^targ^
				"' WHERE STRCMP(`file`,'"^fname^"')=0" in
			print_endline query ;
			ignore( Mysql.exec db query )
		) t ;
	in
	propagate "STN" ; 
	propagate "VIM" ; 
	propagate "CTX" ; 
	Mysql.disconnect db ;;

Interacting with MySQL is quite easy with Ocaml - though the type system adds a certain overhead, it's not too bad.